Friday, 2 July 2010

Photography and Permission



 Layers of heavy tyvek, machine stitched together and zapped back with a heat gun

There was one small thing that caused one or two niggles over the 2 days at Denman, the taking of photographs without permission. With so many different types of camera now available – from phones to digital video – it is becoming increasingly easy to just snap away and not necessarily think about what you’re taking an image of, why you are taking it and how you are going to use it.
I think most tutors are happy to have general shots of themselves and their work taken for sketch books or to show friends. It is quite a different matter when these images are posted onto blogs and websites. This infringes all kinds of copyright issues. It is important to ask permission to take photographs before you do so. Close up and detailed images of samples and someone else’s work are a very contentious issue. I had a particular run in with a lady who was very busy with her small digital video camera. It is difficult to see what is happening around you when you have about 25 ladies all asking questions and having a good time. When I questioned the lady about why she was taking the film she replied she was going to publish it on her website. I politely suggested that would not be a good idea.
Do you have any opinions on this?

4 comments:

  1. Hello Kim - good stuff - really looking forward to more of your blog!

    One of the real problems about copyright infringement is what can you do about it when it happens (especially as there is so much on the internet that you may never even know about it?) I think it really comes down to a sort of gentlemen's agreement, and sadly not every man or woman is a gentleman.

    Can I ask the further question as to whether there can really be copyright on creativity? How do you prove you got there first?

    That said, I hope you managed to persuade the bold videoer not to use your work - did you get a note of her website?!

    Christine

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  2. Welcome to the blogging world, Kim :)

    As for unauthorized photos, that's a BIG issue--if i want to show someone else's work, i contact them first and ask: if i don't hear back, i *might* post them anyways BUT WITH PROPER CREDIT AND A LINK, or at the very least, the URL on *their* blog/website where it is posted legitimately. And i always make it known that i will remove it all if asked. I've had it done with my work as well,and don't mind if the rules are followed--it *is* publicity and the net is full of visuals, but the only time this "crossposting" gets up my bonnet, is when they lift a whole entry/article and even with credit, this is JUST NOT DONE :)

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  3. Hi Kim

    This is the third time I've tried to post a comment about "permissions".... if you are reading this then it works!
    Whoever videos/photographs stuff at your workshops should put the following wording on their website: "published with kind permission of Kim Thittichai, (Name of workshops, place, date).

    Jen Hen (Information Scientist in another life)

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  4. I always ask permission first before photographing any artist's work, especially at workshops. I usually find most people are happy to have you photograph and put onto blogs as long as the original person is referenced. It is not only courteous; in a university situation it is called plagiarism if you do not acknowledge your sources. My daughter had the beegeebies scared out of her in her first year of law when they told them of cases where students were not allowed to practice law because they plagiarised while studying.

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